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October 12, 2018 at 7:26 am

Emotional state of mind can be self destructive. Keep that in mind next time you feel emotional.

September 27, 2019 at 5:43 am

There is always emotion.

This question is a desire. It reflects regret, self reflection, and a need to be better.

And as logical and Vulcan we think our cool thinking selves to be, we’re always happy to be right, and offended when we’re wrong.

Debates tend to be emotional. That’s because both sides are wanting to be right and not wanting to be wrong. Most people can’t let go of their subjective selves for emotional reasons.

The prize isn’t just to be right — it’s to retain the right to feel right and feel you’re better than anyone else. It’s the feeling of winning that we’re after. Unfortunately, schools train us to think and feel this way by grading us and rewarding us by our correctness. This reinforces emotions, not logic, as logical as their reasons may be.

There is always logic also.

Any description, even that of emotion above, is logical. We are able to make sense, and sense is made logically.

And this logic exists before and after any emotion. Why did you feel a certain way? If you investigate you will find answers, and much more will make sense. What happened after you felt this way? More truth, more sense.

So as emotional as we are, the emotions themselves are true premises in and of themselves. They become the root of truth for our lives and our reality. Emotions are the facts.

The one thing emotions are not, is logic itself. Logic works with premises. Emotions are the premises.

So how can I be more logical than emotional?

There is no “more”. Both are unavoidable, but also welcomed.

The more emotional you are, the more facts about yourself you have to work with.

The more logical you are, the more truth you’ll get out of your emotional facts.

One is fed to the other.

For the most part, working on your critical thinking skills is easier than training your emotions. We are who we are. If becoming less emotional entails being less yourself, then you’re locking yourself in a cage of your own making.

That will just lead to its own set of emotions.

September 27, 2019 at 9:43 am

There is always emotion.

This question is a desire. It reflects regret, self reflection, and a need to be better.

And as logical and Vulcan we think our cool thinking selves to be, we’re always happy to be right, and offended when we’re wrong.

Debates tend to be emotional. That’s because both sides are wanting to be right and not wanting to be wrong. Most people can’t let go of their subjective selves for emotional reasons.

The prize isn’t just to be right — it’s to retain the right to feel right and feel you’re better than anyone else. It’s the feeling of winning that we’re after. Unfortunately, schools train us to think and feel this way by grading us and rewarding us by our correctness. This reinforces emotions, not logic, as logical as their reasons may be.

There is always logic also.

Any description, even that of emotion above, is logical. We are able to make sense, and sense is made logically.

And this logic exists before and after any emotion. Why did you feel a certain way? If you investigate you will find answers, and much more will make sense. What happened after you felt this way? More truth, more sense.

So as emotional as we are, the emotions themselves are true premises in and of themselves. They become the root of truth for our lives and our reality. Emotions are the facts.

The one thing emotions are not, is logic itself. Logic works with premises. Emotions are the premises.

So how can I be more logical than emotional?

There is no “more”. Both are unavoidable, but also welcomed.

The more emotional you are, the more facts about yourself you have to work with.

The more logical you are, the more truth you’ll get out of your emotional facts.

One is fed to the other.

For the most part, working on your critical thinking skills is easier than training your emotions. We are who we are. If becoming less emotional entails being less yourself, then you’re locking yourself in a cage of your own making.

That will just lead to its own set of emotions.

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September 27, 2019 at 10:18 am

Learn to say “NO”.

Surround yourself with the right people whom you consider as logical. As you will able to learn many things from them. Make you learn only good habits of those people.
Be brave enough to stand alone when everyone is going with the crowd. Its good to stand alone.
Be smart enough to differentiate between what is right and what is wrong for you.
Set some goals. Work your assoff to acheive them, instead of getting distracted by useless things which seems to be great, but i will tell you all of these things (useless) are temporary.

September 27, 2019 at 10:31 am

Cognitive dissonance is the internal strife each person has between two opposing notions. The theory says that nobody likes it and that people do all they can to attain a state of internal congruence.

Cognitive dissonance is extremely common and we are engaging in a lot of the methods without realizing it.

Well, ever failed a test and decided the course was not worth it?

Ever took a decision and reinforced the belief that the decision taken was the right one all along?
This happens every time you take a decision! Except when the reality is too strong to ignore. In which case, Cognitive dissonance once again is at work, only the other way round!

Every did something you didn’t like doing for a higher goal?
If you did, there is a huge chance that you are going to exaggerate the desirability of the goal!

Ever made an irrevocable choice?
You are going to be happy with it! Because Cognitive dissonance theory will not allow you feel regret for too long! Studies suggest that bettors at a racetrack are more confident in their chosen horse just after placing the bet because they cannot change it!!

Confirmation bias is yet another example of Cognitive Dissonance theory. There are many kinds of such dissonances.

One can only be logical if one is constantly aware of the dissonance. This can only happen through practising mindfulness techniques and introspection.

November 7, 2019 at 7:00 am

I’ve been in this exact situation.

I have always had big ambitions and goals and clear direction, but I used to lack everything else that would get me there. I used to play a lot of video games, watch TV for hours and prefer just doing nothing to what I should be doing. I’d feel guilty about being lazy but the guilt was never enough to stop my bad habits.

Today, I hardly watch any TV and I never just sit around. I utilise every second I can to reach my goals.

It only took me about six months to get to this level of productivity from how I used to be.

What you need to develop is a drive, and the thing that jump starts a drive is passion. You need to be as passionate about your goals as you can be. You say that you’re ambitious, so what exactly are your ambitions? Do you have a clear goal that you want to achieve?

And the big question, How much do you want it?

This is the thing that I couldn’t answer well before. I wanted it, but how much? More than I wanted to relax, more than I wanted to sleep, more than I wanted that instant gratification? At the time, as much as I didn’t want to admit it, the answer was no.

So, instead of reading self-help books (that I was too lazy to read anyway) or repeating positive affirmations, or taking practical action straight away, I started with something much simpler: I focused on my goal. In my own head, I began questioning myself, asking myself if I really wanted it. And I also began visualising the worst case scenario. What if I went through life and never made anything significant of myself? I believed myself to be talented; what if I let all those talents go to waste? What if I die with nothing to my name, no success, no recognition, no respect? All those outcomes absolutely terrified me (and they still do). And as they say “fear is the greatest motivator”.

From the moment I realised that those outcomes terrified me, they would constantly be on my mind. And they grew. They grew into an overwhelming need to do something, right now. They became a source of very strong motivation. I would spend my whole eight hour work day thinking, questioning and imagining and leave work feeling so pumped to start my “real” work. At first those feelings of motivation didn’t last very long and I would slip back into something lazy after being productive for a short while, but the thoughts were never far away, and they never failed to motivate me again. Over time those periods of motivation and productivity grew and grew and now I feel like I could be productive every minute of the day.

Looking back on how I was six months ago, I realise I am still very much the same person. I’m just as tired, just as ready to relax and just as in love with playing video games, but none of those things matter to me anymore as much as my goal does.

Picture your worst case scenario. How do you feel about dying the way you are now, lacking willpower and discipline? That you describe yourself as a “rubbish human” tells me that you hate your current mindset. The only way to get out of it is to do something. Every second you work away from the person you are now, you become closer to the person you want to be. The mind is a powerful thing and it can push you. I guarantee that if you want something enough, you will work to get it. The first step is just realising how much.

November 7, 2019 at 8:03 am

From my own experiences with life and people. Here is what I can tell you.

No matter how hard you try to change, If you are sensitive you will continue to be sensitive.
It’s better to stop trying to change and divert your sensitivity towards a more receptive medium. Divert your emotions and love and yes expectations that generate these emotions towards the one who actually acknowledges them. In my case, it has to be my best friend.
Now what I should have told to my friend who hurt me just for a movie? I should have told that person I find it weird that someone could reject watching a better movie. But it’s okay. And not that word that I am “hurt”, after all that friend could not acknowledge it.
So I was called childish and stupid for getting hurt over small issues. Should I be ashamed of being so sensitive, then? Obviously no. Should I try to avoid being hurt? No. I should just know who has the right to hurt me and who doesn’t. Like my best friend must have that right but not that friend of scene 1. There are too many people out there who are emotionally numb, I am better off without them. At least that’s what God made humans for, to love and spread love and to feel the emotions.